12:57 am
18 April 2015
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Animal Pus Bag

Animal Pus Bag
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29 comments

  • There are conditions common on farms that are unavoidable since the animals are outdoors. When they get bit sometimes you can’t see the bite and before you know it, it’s infected. It’s not usually neglect, and although it does hurt the animal during the draining process, the relief they feel when it’s all over is worth it because it’s not nearly as painful as the abcess itself.

  • Doesn’t surprise me…more mexican filth, just coming out of the poor bull that’s not been taken care of. No wonder they come up to steal health care from the United States…they sure as **ZIT** don’t take care of themselves!

  • That’s just ignorant, victoriaphibes, to zitume that Mexicans don’t know how to take care of livestock. That aside, this poor bull’s condition has nothing to do with cleanliness or a lack of it. It’s not uncommon for livestock to get infections like this, and it’s very difficult to tell when they have one until it gets so big that it’s visible under the skin and causes obvious changes in their behavior (from the discomfort). This one was being lanced properly by someone who knew what he was doing (probably a vet).

  • If it was abuse, they wouldn’t have gotten the vet(zituming that is a vet, judging by the gloves and equiptment) to come out and treat the animal.
    Notice how agitated the bull is, up until they really start to drain it. It’s obviously relieved, and it’s nice that it’s been sorted out. Otherwise the animal appears to be of good weight and condition, save an old scar.

  • every where in the world outdoor animals get these abcesses. The best way to take care of them is to drain them.
    My grandmother worked as a nurse in the ER and she told me about how drug addicts come in with abcesses like/worse than this, and they don’t even cry out because the relief is worth it.

  • I do have to agree this isn’t the best way to treat one. The bull should have been put to sleep during the procedure for the sake of the people taking care of it at least.

  • you know ii think in this case it is the owner too blame look at the scars on the animal. i dont want to know what they looked like before they made a scar

  • Abscesses are not something you see everyday on the farm, but you see some (more animals = more abscesses). For those that want Mr (actually not badly behaved) bull numbed or under GA: I have some pearls for you: 1)Injectable lidocaine or even topical cocaine: pro: clinician feels better; con: the pain of the injection is often more painful then the incision. As an ER nurse I worked with a doc that would give people the option of lidocaine or nothing when it was an I&D or up to 3 s**ZIT**ches. Vets do this routinely. As far as general anestetia (I can’t spell tonite), it is not particularly safe to put a cow under and it really does not change their perception of what has happened. Hate to say it but when I’ve treated cows and horses, its cut and run.

  • Abscesses are not something you see everyday on the farm, but you see some (more animals = more abscesses). For those that want Mr (actually not badly behaved) bull numbed or under GA: I have some pearls for you: 1)Injectable lidocaine or even topical cocaine: pro: clinician feels better; con: the pain of the injection is often more painful then the incision. As an ER nurse I worked with a doc that would give people the option of lidocaine or nothing when it was an I&D or up to 3 s**ZIT**ches. Vets do this routinely. As far as general anestetia (I can’t spell tonite), it is not particularly safe to put a cow under and it really does not change their perception of what has happened. Hate to say it but when I’ve treated cows and horses, its cut and run.

  • yet another prime example why you should consider where your meat comes from. peta.com = meat your meet. you would be surprised to know that mcdonalds among a lot of other fast food places purchases “broken” meat. im with Gooch vegetarian special for me plz. you never know what youre eating. not to mention the hormones they pump these animals full of so they grow twice as big…. but thats a whole other subject.

  • good god, fella, Judging from the bellow of that beast you better leave him alone. If he gets hold of you, one or the other will have to find some relief!

  • gotta agree w/ Ivegottasecret…cut & run is method of choice. General anesthesia will kill a cow, their rumen just can’t handle it, and locals often hurt more than the I&D itself. Watch the cows behavior…it jumps around like it’s saying “hey, back the f off my hip hurts”, but as the presure is relieved, he realizes that the vet is helping and quiets down. His initial jumping is, at least in part, to guarding a hip that has been painfull for several days.

  • I dont think general anest. for a cyst happens on the farm. The big guy really calms @ about 2:00 as If to say ” i dunno what just happened but boy that feels good” These animals go a coupla thousand pounds. I think they can tolerate a little slice to relieve a big old cyst.

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