11:11 am
09 October 2015

Biggie Sized Lipoma Removed from Dog!

Biggie Sized Lipoma Removed from Dog!
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***** WARNING!! *****
Graphic Animal Surgery!!
Sensitive Members, Please Consider Carefully…
Viewer Discretion Is Advised!
***** WARNING!! ******

Holy huge lipoma!!! Big dog or not, that is one heck of a hump to have riding on your back. Thank goodness it was removed – and as you’ll see, the surgery goes wonderfully smooth. Loved this vet, and look forward to seeing more from him!!! Thanks all, hope you enjoy this one!!

:) :) :)

“This is the surgical excision of a lipoma, fatty tumor, from a 90 pound mixed breed dog. Just another surgical case encountered fairly often. Just don’t understand why pet owners let these thing get this big…

For the written portion go to this article blog posting:


RUNTIME: 4min 58sec

TITLE: “Veterinary Surgeon Removes M**ZIT**ive Lipoma (Fatty Tumor) from a Dog”
YT INFO: Published on Feb 18,2013 by Roy Faulkner DVM

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  • i agree with the youtube comment: why, oh why, do owners let these things get that big? if it is a matter of money, most – not all – vets will work something out with a pet owner because they love animals and they know that their services can be a drain on a pet owner’s budget. they love animals and i am sure that it pains them to see something like this that could have been treated when it was more managable. unfortunately, the health costs of pets is just as expensive as for people. but, if an animal is truly a family member, something can always be worked out. you wouldn’t let granny have something on her back grow to this size.

    • Most vets here want payment when service is rendered. It coat me $200 to have blood drawn on a bird. Unfortunately you can’t get medical insurance for a pet.

    • Well and truly! I run a rescue here in Australia and in my opinion, this cons**ZIT**utes neglect and abuse. That would have put too much pressure on this poor dog’s back. It would be in constant pain!

      Having said that…. We have a rescue who did overnight, come up with two tennis ball sized cysts on her front legs. Overnight. I freaked out and we were off to the vets. Turns out that her breed (pure bred kelpie, papers and all- who dumps a stunning looking dog!! As I found out, she is stupid!) is **ZIT**e to the cysts she developed and they can come up overnight. To say the least hers were i & d and she had shunts put in to let the last of it out slowly. It’s taken her 3 months to completely heal and she is still likely to have them reoccur. If it can happen to us – people who are constantly surround by animals who are never in cages and would rather sleep on my lap and have a snuggle, then it can happen to anyone. I’ve had instances where people have been on holidays and had someone else feed their pets and come back to something nasty….. We need to ensure that we don’t judge other people (says one of the most judgemental people in the rescue community!).

  • Wow – what a lump. That was getting so big, it would have been affecting the poor dog’s gait and could have caused back problems.
    What surprised me was that it had a pretty small blood supply for such a large, and growing, lipoma. Only one significant clamp seemed to be required.

  • Justsqueezit thanks for this wonderful video.

    I’ve **ZIT**isted on hundreds of operations and I’ve felt that vets make the best surgeons. I’d trust my own life in their hands. I’ve seen some human surgeons so arrogant, and full of themselves…can’t believe I even slept with them. *ew*

    This guy knew what he was doing, no wasted movements, had the Git-r-Done mode switched on and was awesome to watch. No bull**ZIT**.

    Now on to the lucky patient. YIPPEEEEEEEE!!! I hope it can run FAST and jump HIGH and do tricks and roll in a dead squirrel to make them smell perfect and have a great life!!!

    (anyone with a dog knows about rolling in dead stuff ~whew~)

    • Our **ZIT**er-lab mix loved to roll in the rotting fishies on the lakes**ZIT** in the springtime…
      Between that and attacking skunks, it was no wonder that he was banished to the breezeway….

      • haha, my kelpie won’t even put her delicate little feet in the river! She went in once, got about a foot deep and started crying. I had to climb on in and carry her out.

  • Could anyone tell if that scale said 3.5 pounds or 3.5 kilograms? Either way, that was just m**ZIT**ive. Letting it get to that size must have made the surgery more difficult and expensive. That incision was easily a foot long.

    Now that dog can lie on his side and not wobble around.

  • They let them go because of the expense. I was just quoted $1,020 to remove a kidney-bean-sized lipoma from my 40-lb dog’s shoulder–and that’s IF they didn’t need to do bloodwork and IF this didn’t happen, or that, etc.

    I can’t imagine what these owners had to pay for this poor pup. Still, they should have done something long before this stage!

    • I was thinking the same thing! I’m surprised no one else caught that or said anything! That poor dog flinches every time he is cut!! I don’t understand why doctors can’t grasp the fact that these poor animals DO feel pain!! I have run into the very same issue with human patients too! I’m a NICU nurse, and it absolutely infuriates me that doctors don’t “get it” that babies, (especially premature babies) DO feel pain!!! If you had hernia surgery, how do you think you would respond to PLAIN TYLENOL for pain?!!! Useless!! But I have seen that very same thing done over and over! So tired of having to fight to get something for these poor babies for pain control. Sadly, I see its the same thing with our pets! Speak up for your loved ones!! The TWO and FOUR legged ones!

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